Talking to Kids About Events in the News

DO

Ask open-ended questions to discover children’s knowledge about the event. It will also give you an opportunity to clear up any misinformation.

  • What have you heard about this case?
  • What would you do if anyone made you uncomfortable or asked you to keep a secret from me?
  • HOW can kids help Other kids Who are being bullied or abused?

LISTEN

Let children lead the discussion. Listen more than you talk and let them know you value their beliefs and opinions. Ask follow-up questions (“And then?” ) to keep the conversation going.

RECOGNIZE TRUSTED ADULTS

Encourage your child to tell a trusted adult if any issue like that in the news arises. Provide kids with some examples of who to trust, such as yourself or the school counselor.

KEEP

Keep your tone light and conversational to ensure children feel safe to open up.

CHILDREN AGE FIVE AND UNDER

Young children may overhear something about the event and have questions. They simply need to know that the action is bad and is never the fault of the abused child. Then, tell them that if anyone ever touches them in a private place or makes them uncomfortable, to tell mommy and daddy immediately.

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